Supermassive Black Hole At The Centre Of Milky Way Pictured For First Time

Because nothing can get out of black holes, physicists struggle understanding these objects. Not even the laws of physics tell us what happens when something falls into a black hole—at least not yet. Therefore, black holes remain cosmic mysteries, and many scientists work hard to solve the mystery of black holes. And by comparing these new observations with those of M87, researchers can learn more about how black holes of different masses behave. Finally there are the supermassive black holes that inhabit the centre of most galaxies. These are thought to arise relatively soon after their galaxies are formed, devouring enormous amounts of material to achieve colossal size.

The merging of both light and heavy seeds and the subsequent ingestion of more matter may then lead to a supermassive black hole. It is believed that one may exist at the centre of the Milky Way, as well as at the … Read More

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Supermassive Black Hole At Center Of Milky Way Photographed For The First Time

Instead, Kepler ended up detecting the flares of what the scientists claim are a pair of merging black holes. Capturing images of such a faraway object required linking eight giant radio observatories across the planet to form a single ‘Earth-sized’ virtual telescope called the EHT. Although a bit of company might seem welcome, infalling particles spiral into the black hole in a turbulent flow, rubbing up against each other. As we’ve seen, the accretion disc formed emits radiation due to this friction and, because of the immensity of the gravitational pull, particles are accelerated up to significant fractions of the speed of light.

Dr Ziri Younsi from UCL helped run many black hole simulations over five years of rigorous image analysis. The soundwaves were discovered in data recorded by the Chandra X-ray observatory at NASA, who said they adapted the soundwaves into human hearing range by transposing them up 57 … Read More

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